Part 2 – Collaboration to Diabetes Health Equity: Best Practices, Next Steps, and Sustainability

Course Information

The delivery of health care by a coordinated team of individuals has always been assumed to be a good thing. Patients reap the benefits of more eyes and ears, the insights of different bodies of knowledge, and a wider range of skills. Thus, team care has generally been embraced by most as a criterion for high quality care. Despite its appeal, team care, especially in the primary care setting, remains a source of confusion and some skepticism.

With the aging of the population and the advances in the treatment of diabetes, teamwork in the context of diabetes management needs to be re-examined. Successful chronic disease interventions usually involve a coordinated multidisciplinary care team.The delivery of health care by a coordinated team of individuals has always been assumed to be a good thing. Patients reap the benefits of more eyes and ears, the insights of different bodies of knowledge, and a wider range of skills. Thus, team care has generally been embraced by most as a criterion for high quality care. Despite its appeal, team care, especially in the primary care setting, remains a source of confusion and some skepticism.

With the aging of the population and the advances in the treatment of diabetes, teamwork in the context of diabetes management needs to be re-examined. Successful chronic disease interventions usually involve a coordinated multidisciplinary care team.

Please follow and tweet us @PforDHE #BetesCollab

Learning Objectives:

The intended purpose of the PDHE LC was to recognize and support best practices and their integration into a continuum of services, and to mobilize all stakeholders concerned with diabetes treatment around the following objectives and outcomes:

  1. Reduce the risk factors that contribute to diabetes;
  2. Reduce the complications of diabetes;
  3. Reduce hospitalizations and emergency stays for people with diabetes;
  4. Improve medication adherence;
  5. Improve patients’ quality of life and satisfaction with diabetes prevention and management programs as well as the satisfaction of those who care for them;
  6. Provide individuals with self-management support;
  7. Improve the satisfaction of professionals in their daily clinical practice; and
  8. Improve the health of the population.

The Morehouse School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Morehouse School of Medicine designates this live educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This course should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

Original Release

Date: 6/21/2017

Time: 2PM EST

(2:00pm to 3:00pm)

Please follow and tweet us  @PforDHE #BetesCollab

Moderator

Sabrina Y. Jackson, PA-C, MMSc Project Director of Partnership for Diabetes Health Equity

Clinical Instructor in the Department of Family Medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine. She is a native of Atlanta, GA and received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology from Jackson State University and her Masters of Medical Science PA Degree from Emory University.

Sabrina has been a PA for over 16 years in various clinic settings and finds the most joy when working with disparate populations. She joined the faculty at MSM July 2009 and currently coordinates web based clinical education for medical providers and is the co- director of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Morehouse School of Medicine Partnership for Diabetes Health Equity project at the National Center for Primary Care.

Panelists

Richland Public Health - Mansfield, OH

Richland County serves a population of approximately 121,107, that is multi-ethnic and predominately English speaking.  Demographics of the population served is:  87.4% Caucasian, 9.6% African American, 1.8% Hispanic/Latino, 0.7% Asian, 0.2% American Indian/Alaskan Native, 2.0% two or more races.  There are large pockets of extreme poverty populations within the city of Mansfield which makes up the bulk of Richland County’s population.  The CDC indicates that the rate of diagnosis for diabetes in this region is 11.9 % (2013), diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in Richland County between 2006-2008.  Approximately 15.1% of the population is at or below poverty level.  The CDC ratio was used to determine a rate of 32.5% at risk of diabetes in Richland County.

Diabetes Health and Wellness Institute - Dallas, TX

The Baylor Scott & White Health and Wellness Center (BSW HWC) is a collaborative project between the City of Dallas and Baylor Scott & White Health Care System (BSWHCS).  BSW HWCserves South Dallas and is in the Frazier community in the Juanita J Craft Recreation Center.

The Diabetes Self-Management Education Training program (DSMET) is a major component in the total experience that BSW HWC offers to clients.  However, we have some challenges with the DSMET program; we have challenges with participation/attendance rates and want to be more effective in goal setting, monitoring and documentation of outcomes.

Engagement in a DSMET program is particularly important for our clients with diabetes, as we know that completion of our DSMET program results in better management of one’s diabetes including control of his or her A1c.  BSW HWC seeks to better understand the rate in which we experience client retention for the DSMET program. We began the Collaborative with a DSMET participate retention rate of approximately 50%.

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Azle - Azle, TX

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital serves the communities in Northwestern Tarrant, Parker and Wise Counties. Texas Health Azle is a not for profit hospital committed to improving the health of the community. As a department of the hospital, Healthy Education and Lifestyles Program (HELP) is a program designed to help decrease barriers and increase access to appropriate care for uninsured patients living with certain chronic diseases. It also provides coordinated care to increase patients’ self-efficacy to better manage their chronic disease. HELP provides access to a clinical visit, education, and a support group during each session. Patients also are connected to local resources such as prescription assistance and eye care.